Diabetes Mellitus

Risk Factors Of Developing Pre-Diabetes


The risk factors for developing prediabetes are the same that increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Following are the risk factors which need your consideration.

Family history
If you have a brother, sister or parents who have type 2 diabetes, your chances of developing prediabetes increase.

Overweight
Obesity is one of the most common risk factors for prediabetes. The more fatty tissues you develop, the more resistant your muscle and tissue cells become to your own insulin. This is especially true when your excess weight is concentrated around your abdomen. So, in most of the cases, overweight leads to the development of the pre-diabetes.

Inactivity
Your inactivity leads to the development of prediabetes. The more inactive you are, the greater is the risk of your having prediabetes. Physical activity helps you control your weight, uses up glucose as energy, and helps your cells to become more sensitive to insulin. Exercise enables your muscles to absorb glucose and burn energy and is therefore a very sound way to stay away from the pre-diabetes.

Age
Old age makes you vulnerable to pre-diabetes. Your risk of prediabetes becomes higher as your grow older, especially when you cross 45. The reason is that as people grow older, they tend to become physically inactive, loose muscle mass and gain weight.

Race
It's quite unknown as to why people of certain races are more prone to develop diabetes than others. If you're African-American or Hispanic, you're more likely to have diabetes than someone who's white. But if you're an American Indian or Alaska Native, your risk of developing type 2 diabetes doubles as compared to whites. I tell you, Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders also have a higher risk of developing pre-diabetes.

Gestational diabetes
Gestational diabetes also increases the chance of developing the prediabetes. If you have developed gestational diabetes during pregnancy, your risk of developing type 2 diabetes is greater.

High birth weight
If you gave birth to a baby whose weight is more than 9 pounds, you're at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

These are the some of the important risk factors which entail special attention in absence of which they are enough to trigger pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes thereafter.